A Chinese rocket is about to make an uncontrolled re-entry into orbit and it is unclear where it will land

A Chinese rocket is about to make an uncontrolled re-entry into orbit and it is unclear where it will land

Last week, the gigantic core of a Chinese rocket used in the launch of the first leg of its space station aspirations is spiraling out of control in Earth’s lower orbit, and no one is sure as to where it may land.

According to “Space News,” the core of Long March 5B, which is considered a variant of the country’s largest rocket, will re-enter Earth over the next week as one of the “largest instances of uncontrolled reentry of a spacecraft”. This rocket just might land on an inhabited area.

The website estimates that the roughly 100-foot-long object orbits Earth every 90 minutes and flies over New York, northern Beijing, and southern New Zealand. The report said that despite the threat, it is likely destined to splash in one of the world’s oceans or in remote areas.

Space observer Jonathan McDowell (Jonathan McDowell) stated on the website that since 1990, there has been no case of a spacecraft over 10 tons “intentionally left in orbit for uncontrolled entry.”

The report indicated that the core phase (without any load) of the rocket has a mass of approximately 21 metric tons. (You can track the rocket online)

According to the “Guardian”, McDowell said: “This may not be good.” “The last time they launched a Long March 5B rocket, they finally flew through the sky with a long metal rod, damaging various buildings in Ivory Coast. Things.”

The Tianhe or “Heaven Harmony” module was launched into space from a Long March 5B rocket at the Wenchang Launch Center in the southern island province of Hainan Province. The payload is the main module of your first permanent space station.

The space program is a source of great national pride. Prime Minister Li Keqiang and other senior civil and military leaders watched the launch live at the Beijing Control Center.

 

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